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Topic Title: Adding a 2nd hard drive
Topic Summary:
Created On: 01/31/2021 10:24 PM
Status: Post and Reply
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 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - jgold55 - 01/31/2021 10:24 PM  
 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - dilligence - 01/31/2021 11:28 PM  
 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - jgold55 - 02/01/2021 10:29 AM  
 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - Lunis Orcutt - 02/01/2021 11:13 AM  
 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - dilligence - 02/01/2021 11:44 AM  
 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - Lunis Orcutt - 02/01/2021 12:50 PM  
 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - kkkwj - 02/01/2021 11:09 PM  
 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - Lunis Orcutt - 02/02/2021 03:37 PM  
 Adding a 2nd hard drive   - kkkwj - 02/03/2021 02:03 PM  
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 01/31/2021 10:24 PM
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jgold55
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Will adding a 2nd hard drive to a laptop improve performance or stability?

Will separating the data and operating systems into 2 different drives improved performance?

What is the recommendation about separating data and operating systems etc.?  Specifically, does that mean only Windows is on one drive and the data and other programs such as Dragon and everything else on the other drive?

Many thanks for your help.



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HP Pavillion dv7;Windows 10 Home; i7 2670-QM @2.2 GHz; 16GB RAM; DPI 15.61; Knowbrainer 2017; Dragon Capture; SpeechStart +; Sennheiser MB Pro 1 UC/ML;  Addasound SR2701

 01/31/2021 11:28 PM
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dilligence
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Not necessarily, but adding an SSD as your main (C) drive will add some speed (and stability) for shure.

 

Personally I don't recommend using one drive for Windows only and another for the programs you are going to install. It holds no real benefits. And most programs expect the standard paths on C.

 

Furthermore If you are planning to do disk imaging with Macrium Reflect for instance then it's much better to have a global C Drive with everything on it.

 

A second (large) drive (physical or partition) is very suitable for storing all kinds of data, produced files downloaded videos, setup files for programs, that kind of thing.



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 02/01/2021 10:29 AM
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jgold55
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Thanks for the reply.

Swapping out my failing standard hard drive for a solid-state drive was probably the best move I ever made for this computer. It starts up much faster and responds faster than the old drive as well.

It is approaching almost 50% capacity where I have read it is better to have a larger capacity hard drive. So if I add the 2nd hard drive I should simply move my data to that hard drive and keep the programs such as DPI and operating system on the first hard drive.

Am I understanding correctly?



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HP Pavillion dv7;Windows 10 Home; i7 2670-QM @2.2 GHz; 16GB RAM; DPI 15.61; Knowbrainer 2017; Dragon Capture; SpeechStart +; Sennheiser MB Pro 1 UC/ML;  Addasound SR2701

 02/01/2021 11:13 AM
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Lunis Orcutt
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This is what M-Tech computer manufacturers recommend and they are our computer go to guys



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 02/01/2021 11:44 AM
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dilligence
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I'm not sure if the 50% capacity rule is crucial. Previously I worked with a small 128 GB SD drive and it only had a couple of gigabytes space left. Never noticed any performance loss in any way.

 

It is a matter of preference but personally I like to keep the operating system and all my installed programs on my C drive. I'm using several other partitions (on a regular HDD). One of them I'm using as the location for all downloads (adjusted the download folder in all browsers).



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 02/01/2021 12:50 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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We also prefer default installations on Drive C but in our opinion, partitioning hasn't been necessary since Windows 2000 and can be a problem to deal with in the event that you run out of space.

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 02/01/2021 11:09 PM
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kkkwj
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It's usually a good practice to separate your OS files from your data files, as you mentioned above. That way, if you lose one, you won't lose the other. And if you upgrade your OS and want the whole disk, you won't have to mess with your data. I've found over the decades that if I'm not careful, I end up with data spread into the OS disk (c:\users\me\Documents, etc) as well as on other drives. That was a pain because I wanted to back up my OS more frequently than my data, and the data added a lot of time to backups, so I found myself doing OS backups less regularly.


But my preferred policies have changed with my most recent machine. It has 2TB on the C drive, and so I put all my dev (data) projects on that drive to get them backed up with the OS. Also, the backups are so big and fast now that I just back up the whole lot. I still keep a huge amount of data on separate drives and back them up with OneDrive and Dropbox. And I use fast local drives for videos and things (like Rob says), where I don't worry about backups.


I don't think having separate drives these days makes a difference for normal users because everything is so fast (CPUs, i/o, ssds, ssd caches, etc.) Unless you're constantly rendering huge graphics files or videos (in which a RAID disk setup can help), normal drives will work fine. I do recommend SSDKeeper, which is a caching program for SSD drives. I could feel the difference when I installed it. It uses extra RAM to reduce reads and writes to the SSD disk. Well worth the $80 or whatever the price was.


Filling up an SSD shortens its lifespan, which is why they talk about trying to stay below 50% or whatever. Under the hood, SSDs do many more reads and writes than you would think to make room for incoming data. And all the extra reads and writes to move data in preparation for the write that you actually want to do shortens their lifespan. But filling up the disk doesn't slow it down much (until the very end :-)).

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Win10/x64, AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, 64GB RAM, Dragon 15.3, SP 6 PRO, SpeechStart, Office 365, KB 2017, Dragon Capture, Samson Meteor USB Desk Mic, Klim and JUKSTG earbuds with microphones, 3 BenQ 2560x1440 monitors, Microsoft Sculpt Keyboard and fat mouse

 02/02/2021 03:37 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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SSDKeeper sounds interesting but at $50 per month, for 5 - 9 computers, we are hesitant to recommend it for consumer workstations.



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 02/03/2021 02:03 PM
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kkkwj
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Wow, that sounds expensive! But you're right, Lunis - I checked their website, and they have completely changed their product line and pricing model.

 

I bought the home edition of SSDKeeper a few years ago for a once-only price of $69-$89 (or whatever it was; well under $100). I was trying to figure out how I could improve my computing experience for $100 or $200. There was a professional version for $129 or something, but the only difference was that the pro version could use more than 2GB of spare RAM. The tech guy felt it wasn't worth it for home users.

 

I could feel the change when I installed SSDKeeper - it was like having a giant RAM cache. I also looked at RAM disks and trying to load my apps (Office, VStudio) off the RAM disk, but it was a lot of work and maintenance for a small gain. So I went with SSDKeeper.


It sounds like they weren't earning enough money, so they combined their products to establish a higher combined price and are trying to stabilize their revenue stream by going to a subscription model. They also dropped their home editions, so they're aiming at companies, not people. Would I pay $120 a year for SSDKeeper? Not likely. I could buy a completely new 2TB SSD every two years for that kind of money. Thank you for taking the time to look at their website and making your post. I'll stop talking about SSDKeeper now.



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Win10/x64, AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, 64GB RAM, Dragon 15.3, SP 6 PRO, SpeechStart, Office 365, KB 2017, Dragon Capture, Samson Meteor USB Desk Mic, Klim and JUKSTG earbuds with microphones, 3 BenQ 2560x1440 monitors, Microsoft Sculpt Keyboard and fat mouse



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