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Topic Title: Speechware FlexyMike speaker options - headphones, or ...
Topic Summary: does microphone near lips pickup sounds from headphones over ears?
Created On: 01/27/2021 01:31 AM
Status: Post and Reply
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 Speechware FlexyMike speaker options - headphones, or ...   - Ag - 01/27/2021 01:31 AM  
 Speechware FlexyMike speaker options - headphones, or ...   - Lunis Orcutt - 01/27/2021 11:59 AM  
 Speechware FlexyMike speaker options - headphones, or ...   - Ag - 01/27/2021 03:38 PM  
 Speechware FlexyMike speaker options - headphones, or ...   - Lunis Orcutt - 01/27/2021 07:37 PM  
 Speechware FlexyMike speaker options - headphones, or ...   - Ag - 02/01/2021 05:06 PM  
 Speechware FlexyMike speaker options - headphones, or ...   - Lunis Orcutt - 02/01/2021 07:45 PM  
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 01/27/2021 01:31 AM
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Ag
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A question for anybody who is using the SpeechWare FlexyMike worn on the head  microphone,  or any other wearable microphone that does not  have built-in headphone speakers.

 

Q:   what do you do for  the sounds you want to hear?    

 

? use PC speakers ? ...  I see that SpeechWare's TableMike base has the option of the speakers ...  I imagine that a good cardioid near your lips will do a pretty good job of rejecting a sound source near the PC or base

 

But what about headphone speakers, worn over your ears?    These  might very well be  within the cardioid microphone pickup region. Has anybody tried these and found problems?

 

 rationale:  sometimes I  will  use the microphone set up but I use for speech recognition to participate in meetings e.g. over Zoom. Sometimes I might not want to disturb  people physically nearby I having them listen to what others say in the meeting ( it is unavoidable that they have to listen to what I say in the meeting, but in many meetings I'm just listening myself, not talking very much).    sometimes it's a privacy issue.

 

I know from experience with my Sennheiser MB Pro  that loud sounds coming out of  headphones on my ears  can be picked up by the microphone near my lips. (Lost opportunity for noise cancellation;  probable hearing damage, but it's not always too loud, sometimes just distinctive.)

 

Stretching things a bit:   I wonder if  bone conduction headphones, such as my wife wears when running, might provide good enough sound without being picked up by the FlexyMike or other microphone near lips,  cardioid or not.

 



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DPG15.6 (also DPI 15.3) + KB, Sennheiser MB Pro 1 UC ML, BTD 800 dongle, Windows 10 Pro, MS Surface Book 3, Intel Core i7-1065G7 CPU @ 1.3/1.5GHz (4 cores, 8 logical, GPU=NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000 with Max-Q Design.

 01/27/2021 11:59 AM
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Lunis Orcutt
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Most speakerless headset microphones, like the FlexyMikes, can be used under your favorite high fidelity stereo headset. Although we use a desktop microphone, headphones are a must for us. We preferr large cup (open air or closed) headsets like the Sennheiser HD 800 but stereo earplugs work just as well.

External computer speakers, used at a low volume level, are acceptable but keep in mind that any noise is going to lower your microphone accuracy. Some microphones are more noise rejecting than others; such as the Audio-Technica Pro 8HEmW but it is best to eliminate any environmental noise if possible.

 

We have only tested a few bone conduction headphones but from a speech recognition point of view, they were unacceptable.



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 01/27/2021 03:38 PM
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Ag
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Lunis: Most speakerless headset microphones, like the FlexyMikes, can be used under your favorite high fidelity stereo headset. Although we use a desktop microphone, headphones are a must for us. We preferr large cup (open air or closed) headsets like the Sennheiser HD 800 but stereo earplugs work just as well.

 

Good: headphones are a must for me, mainly for the virtual conferencing issue,  but also because more and more I like having audio and verbal feedback From my PC, both for speech commands, but also for things like  notifying me when a long-running task that I'm waiting on has finished, like a big make/compilation job.

 

I don't listen to music much at all, so have no "favorite high fidelity stereo headset". 

 

 

External computer speakers, used at a low volume level, are acceptable but keep in mind that any noise is going to lower your microphone accuracy.

 

I am guessing that the concern you are addressing here is listening to music over the headset. Like I said, that's not my issue.

 

However, I have had issues when Dragon's error sound on an unrecognized utterance  or non-utterance ( e.g. a loud noise) ( the sort of thing that appears as ???>  in the recognition history)  has led to a cascade -  the first error leads to a sound, which itself is  considered an error, etc.    or at least, I think that's one of the things that I seen happening.    this usually happens when I am at the Oregon coast, with  the constant sound of the surf in the background. No, I do not have automatic gain control enabled,  but I frequently retrain my microphone ("check microphone")  when my audio environment has changed, e.g. going from  quiet in the woods to loud surf on the coast.   the surf, fortunately, is a fairly constant sound,  unlike the chainsaws and wood chippers  that I sometimes encounter in the city.

 

 

We have only tested a few bone conduction headphones but from a speech recognition point of view, they were unacceptable.

 

In what way unacceptable?

 

Did they interfere with the microphone, whether the mic is on a headset or on a table (as in a TableMike?)

 

 Or was the sound for the bone conduction headphone  just not good enough?

 

I emphasize: I am only talking about bone conduction speakers, giving the sound to me. Not bone conduction microphones, taking my sound and giving it to the speech recognition software. I would like to have a (portable/wearable/private) speaker system that has as little interference as possible with the microphone.

 

 like I said, I'm not interested in listening to music, just having occasional pings.  it would be nice if the bone conduction headphones could be used for a virtual  meeting, but since I usually disable speech recognition from meeting,  that might be OK, I might just switch to  a conventional headset

 



-------------------------

DPG15.6 (also DPI 15.3) + KB, Sennheiser MB Pro 1 UC ML, BTD 800 dongle, Windows 10 Pro, MS Surface Book 3, Intel Core i7-1065G7 CPU @ 1.3/1.5GHz (4 cores, 8 logical, GPU=NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000 with Max-Q Design.



 01/27/2021 07:37 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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As an experiment, try recording your voice. We suspect you will find it sounds a little "tinny" compared to what you hear when you speak. This is because part of your voice is passed through your cheekbones, which makes many of us sound like a lower voiced 70s radio DJ. Come to think of it, I actually was a 70s DJ; think Harry Chapin's WOLD. Your voice may sound clear to you but don't bet on Dragon. All we can tell you is that the 2 units we tested were unacceptable. Disclaimer: We haven't tested a conduction microphone in more than a decade but if they worked, you would think someone would be talking about them by now. The noise filtering aspect could probably handle a live gun range or the Big Haired Lady screaming over chipping one of her a fang nails because that's what conduction microphones are designed for. Of course we are always open to more test results



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 02/01/2021 05:06 PM
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Ag
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Again, I am not asking about a bone conduction MICROPHONE.

I am asking whether bone conduction SPEAKERS - if that's the right word, a bone conduction device that is playing sound for my ears to pick up

would interfere with the speech microphone.

--

E.g. I have trouble imaging this happen for a TableMike -unless the vibrations of the bone conduction speaker caused the air around by lips to vibrate enough so that the TableMike picked it up.

I can imagine it happening more likely for a FlexyMike, with the bone conduction speaker coupled with a microphone not through the air, but through the support system.

-------------------------

DPG15.6 (also DPI 15.3) + KB, Sennheiser MB Pro 1 UC ML, BTD 800 dongle, Windows 10 Pro, MS Surface Book 3, Intel Core i7-1065G7 CPU @ 1.3/1.5GHz (4 cores, 8 logical, GPU=NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000 with Max-Q Design.

 02/01/2021 07:45 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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Apologies. We've never tested conduction speakers but we've heard that they work well.

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