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Topic Title: I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?
Topic Summary: Here are some of the things I was thinking people could or might be doing:
Created On: 04/09/2010 12:19 PM
Status: Post and Reply
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 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Aldebaran - 04/09/2010 12:19 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Lunis Orcutt - 04/09/2010 02:25 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Jomark - 04/09/2010 04:45 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - matthewls - 04/09/2010 10:39 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Chucker - 04/10/2010 12:26 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Jomark - 04/11/2010 08:20 AM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Lunis Orcutt - 04/11/2010 12:50 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Jomark - 04/11/2010 03:40 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - TCXO - 10/17/2015 08:11 AM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Lunis Orcutt - 10/18/2015 12:48 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - DarylD - 10/19/2015 12:03 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - danw700 - 10/19/2015 07:12 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - kkkwj - 11/12/2015 02:48 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - docinfniti - 09/08/2020 03:20 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Lunis Orcutt - 09/08/2020 05:24 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - docinfniti - 09/15/2020 03:06 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Lunis Orcutt - 09/15/2020 08:47 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - kkkwj - 09/16/2020 08:28 PM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - Ag - 09/22/2020 12:22 AM  
 I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?   - dilligence - 09/22/2020 11:45 AM  
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 04/09/2010 12:19 PM
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Aldebaran
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I was wonder what people do to back up their operating systems and data?

Here are some of the things I was thinking people could or might be doing:

Don't do any backups and use system restore points to roll the OS back if the US gets messed up and pray to hard drive never breaks. Figure if the hard drive does go bad ill take the system to a shop and pay them to fix the box and reload the operating system from scratch.

Make DVD backups of user data only.

Use an external USB or FireWire independent hard drive and its associated backup software to manually make frequent backups of the entire operating system partition.

Iomega Prestige 1 TB USB 2.0 Desktop External Hard Drive 34275 $99.99
http://www.amazon.com/Iomega-Prestige-Desktop-External-34275/dp/B001D7REJ4/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1270829148&sr=8-2
Includes a license for: EMC's Retrospect Express software

Use a backup service like Carbonite to automatically backup your data.
http://www.carbonite.com/how_it_works

Personally to back up the operating system, I use multiple partitions and multiple operating systems. So I boot out of my main Windows XP into a different Windows XP and backup the entire partition that the main Windows XP is sitting on to another partition called Backup. This way, if I'm making a lot of changes, I can do a daily backup. If something goes wrong, I have multiple choices as to how far I want to roll the OS back. If need be, I can go all the way back to my original base build. Every so often I burn important user data then the DVD blanks and store them in my truck.

Also, if people don't use a backup service, what do you do in case your place burns to the ground for off-site storage of important user data?



-------------------------
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 Coming soon:

Intel i7-860 Lynnfield 2.8GHz 8MB L3 Cache LGA 1156 socket CPU, 8 GB Crucial Ballistix DDR3 1333 RAM, GIGABYTE GA-P55-USB3 LGA 1156 Intel P55 USB 3.0 mombo, ZALMAN CNPS9900A LED 120mm 2 Ball Low-noise Blue LED CPU Cooler, SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB 7200 RPM 32MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s  Hard Drive, AeroCool BX-500 Black 0.8mm SECC Super Mid-Tower Computer Case, Antec EarthWatts EA-500D Green 500W PSU.

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 04/09/2010 02:25 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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We are definitely not claiming to use the best backup system but here's what works for us:

One of the 1st things we do is create a ghost copy of our SSD Drive C onto a secondary identical hard drive so that if our operating system dies, we can switch to the backup with minimal fuss and muss. After ghosting Drive C, we unplug the secondary backup hard drive so that nothing can get to it; not even a virus. If everything goes smoothly, we will typically overwrite the backup once every few months but note that our Drive C only contains Windows 7, application installs, Internet Explorer bookmarks, our NaturallySpeaking user profiles and our Outlook database (contacts, e-mails and appointments).

We store all of our personal files, business and customer information onto a 1 terabit HD. We then use a product called Back In A Flash which is a 32 Gb flash drive that contains a miniature operating system that will allow us to boot our computer, in the event of a catastrophic hard drive operating system failure and open, create and edit standard files such as Microsoft Office. We can even use the Back In A Flash OS to browse our computer with a Windows Explorer type interface. Back In A Flash also contains automatic backup application (its main purpose) that is designed to run automatically without intervention. Although we have to manually back up our Outlook database, Back In A Flash backs up our NaturallySpeaking user files, Internet Explorer bookmarks and all of our business files everyday at 7 PM. If we leave the office, we simply grab the thumb drive size Back In A Flash flash drive to prevent the possibility of losing our computer to theft or fire, when we are away.

On the 1st day of every month, we additionally make a backup copy of our NaturallySpeaking user profile which, as previously noted, we store on the SSD operating system drive. This gives us 3 copies of our NaturallySpeaking profiles. You almost can't make too many copies of your DNS commands and vocabulary if NaturallySpeaking plays a major role in your workflow.


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 04/09/2010 04:45 PM
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Jomark
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It is all a question of how valuable you consider your computer's contents as to how many backups you make and in what format.

In the 1960's for example, an early supermarket business used to make at least 5 copies of its data and one copy was deposited with its bank and the others distributed to different locations.

Many (small?)organisations however do not pay too much attention to backing up their systems until they experience either theft or or damage to their systems and by which time it is too late and they also then fall foul of their insurance policies regarding reinstatement of data cover.

In today's world where almost every business uses computers to run the business it is foolish indeed not to have a regular backup and recovery plan in place.

Personally, I backup my computer daily to an external harddrive and also copy important files to a memory stick(s) and to my laptop. This is not perfect but suits my requirements.



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Jomark


 


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 04/09/2010 10:39 PM
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matthewls
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I use Ghost to make 2-3 cycles of full system backups.

One copy is on an internal drive that only serves this purpose, a second is copied to an external drive that I take home, and the third is a copy of the data drive ghost image that I copy onto my laptop. I try to remember to do at least the first 2 each week, but skip weeks. The data drive is obviously most important...OSs can be reinstalled, but if the work disappears, it's gone.

 04/10/2010 12:26 PM
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Chucker
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There are many ways that you can back up drives, data, and any other important applications and/or information.  There are probably as many ways of doing this as there are users on this forum.  However, consider the following:

1.  Most corporations use dedicated mirror imaging.  That is, any changes to the main server drive(s) are mirrored simultaneously to secondary drive(s) that are maintained solely for this purpose.  If something happens to the main server drive(s) mirroring includes automatic utilities that automatically switch drives so that there is no downtime.  There are other methods that are used along with this.  In fact, some companies triple backup or triple mirror.

2.  Over the years I have found one method and one application that seems to work exceedingly well.  I use Acronis TrueImage for several reasons.  The first reason is that it is a Linux based Windows application.  As such, it is more structurally sound, reliable, and able to detect more types of internal and external storage media.  It also allows you to burn a recovery (bootable using the base Linux kernel) CD directly from the software without having to use any special CD burner software.  Since it boots to Linux, it is more stable and reliable when doing backup recoveries.

The second reason is that Acronis TrueImage allows for full drive image backups, sector by sector backups, data backups, e-mail backups, especially Outlook which backs up not only your e-mails but all your settings, along with a number of other features and utilities that go along way towards protecting and validating your backups, as well as accessing and viewing them.  I know that Norton Ghost does the same thing up to a point.  However, Acronis TrueImage goes well beyond Ghost.

The third reason is that Acronis TrueImage allows you to schedule all backups and runs these tasks automatically in the background at the scheduled times according to the parameters that you set.  In addition, I use it to schedule 2 full backups and one data & e-mail backup per day.  The reason that I scheduled to backups per day (one at noon and one at midnight) is because there are so many changes to my system overall that I never want to be more than 12 hours behind.  I also do manual backups if there's any significant change that can't wait until the scheduled backups run.

The last reason is that Acronis provides updates on a regular basis that don't prompt you with fancy ads or hawk any of their other programs.  It's compatible with all versions of Windows (32 bit and 64-bit) and allows you to set whatever parameters and settings you prefer.  It simply does what it's designed to do, is backed by excellent technical support, which you don't usually need anyway, goes well beyond the average backup program with features and functions, is safe and reliable, and allows you to use virtually any type of backup storage media from internal drives to external drives, CD-ROM drives, DVD-ROM drives, USB thumb drives if they're large enough, external USB and eSATA drives, etc. ad infinitum, ad nauseam, yada yada yada.  Personally, I think it's the best of the best and it's relatively inexpensive.  Acronis also has other utilities that both complement or extend the capabilities of Acronis TrueImage to servers etc.  So they are a full backup and protect utilities software developer with quite excellent safety, reliability, and program functionality.  From the time that I was first introduced to Acronis until the present time I have never had a problem either with the software or restoring/recovering from any crashes that require going to the backup.  I can also drag-and-drop, which I know that Norton Ghost can do all so because that's what I used to use before I moved to Acronis TrueImage, files and data is directly from the backup image.  However, it's much simpler and easier to do this using Acronis TrueImage than it is to do it using Norton Ghost.

For what it's worth.

Chuck Runquist
Technical Project Manager
VoiceTeach LLC

Trouble is the easiest thing to get into and the hardest thing to get out of.  Unknown



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The views, thoughts and opinions expressed in this post are my own and do not reflect those of VoiceTeach LLC.

Chuck Runquist
VoiceComputer technical support

 04/11/2010 08:20 AM
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Jomark
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Chucker

I have used Acronis on my XP computers for a few years.

However on my Windows 7 computer I am using the backup that comes with Windows 7 and I believe it  is a stripped down version of Acronis.

the version of Acronis is 2009 on my XP computer whereas the latest version is 2010 and according to the comparison chart on the Acronis website, only the 2010 version is compatible wth Windows 7.

My question however is if I install Acronis 2010, how do I disable Windows 7 backup?



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Jomark


 


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 04/11/2010 12:50 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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You will find the Windows 7 Backup and Restore utility in the Control Panel when you change the default View by from Category to Small or Large icons. We can't tell you how to turn it off because we've never turned on and we now have a copy of Acronis Home 2010 which we plan on implementing this weekend.

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 04/11/2010 03:40 PM
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Jomark
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Quote:
we now have a copy of Acronis Home 2010

Me too!

I was hoping Chucker would be able to answer my question before taking the plunge.

I think the way to disable the Win7 backup though is to turn off the schedule.

I will try it tomorrow as a backup is currently underway



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Jomark


 


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 10/17/2015 08:11 AM
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TCXO
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I use Carbonite for backing up my computer. I like their technical support.
I have been thinking about adding Acronis True Image.

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 10/18/2015 12:48 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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Originally posted by: TCXO I use Carbonite for backing up my computer. I like their technical support. I have been thinking about adding Acronis True Image.


FrankieM's 12 posts violated the forum. His spamming posts were removed, along with his membership.



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 10/19/2015 12:03 PM
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DarylD
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I use AOMEI Backupper Professional (the company is in China if it matters to you)

At work I have a C: SSD 256G 512 B/s Write, and another inside the chassis so the night scheduled task in 'Backupper' can do a backup, ( oh this is an entire partition written as in immage file) 98 GB on a 220 GB partition, back time: 17 min [At home I back up a 86 GB C: partition from a C: SSD 256G 512 B/s Write to a HD on a 3.0 USB, time: 17 min]

This software has a scheduler so it can auto schedule at night, I'm doing my work computer 4 C: drive backups per week, and a E: backup of every night, and I do one manually every time I do some kind of software install or configuration change.

This software allows you to change your partition size when you restore a drive, very cool when moving from a hard drive to a SSD. it allows you to open the backup image and copy files out of it without restoring it, and more.

Use the new version 3.2. Some versions before that had problems this one seems okay.



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Daryl Davis

 10/19/2015 07:12 PM
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danw700
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Backing up data. As has been mentioned there are many different approaches but there was always safety in numbers.

Understanding the terms. The first real ghost program was developed in New Zealand and cost an arm and a leg but it made a copy sector by sector of an entire drive and everything contained on. The target and the source drive had to be exactly the same. Norton brought it, crippled it and called it Ghost.

Back in the day we used to make copies onto floppy drives which we kept in sets of three moving the front to the back in one made a copy at set times through the day.

I remember buying Acronis when it was on a 5 1/2 inch floppy and we could remove the hard drive out of the chassis to ghost it. You could even buy wiring kits so that you could remove your laptop drive and ghost it.

I started to use Acronis with their Secure Zone where they made an image rather than a cloned ghost. Failed me a couple of times and so basically I still only trust in absolute proper ghost made in a toaster. I use images as an intermediate backstop but I always have a genuine external ghost of my system on standby. Acronis is very good at this because it allows you to download a bootable CD so that the operation can take place completely outside of your operating system and totally mirror your drives.

I also like Acronis and the try and decide which am glad to say they have brought back this year. I think that the Clone tool that Acronis offers is an essential backup mechanism.

I use Time Machine, written in China and Australia that makes a compressed file container image of my system on another internal HDD drive. It runs on a daily schedule, allows the creation of a boot CD, allows Internet Explorer style use and has good self-management reasonable compression. It really is a certain forget. I have not had fault wants yet.

I also like my personal data backed up without being in a container image or being compressed as a backup. I have another internal HDD drive dedicated for these. I use a program call Second Copy which is another certain forget program that will make incremental copies and/or exact copies of files and folders.

I also have CrashPlan running all the time which makes a compressed back (not sector by sector).

One of the main hassles that I come across is as some of the forms of activation that some companies use. Fortunately DNS is not one of those problem companies that there are few that do not like and will object to being restored from a genuine cloned ghost.

My word office documents I also consider is valuable as they have taken time and inspiration to create. I have office automatically make backups of each file and I also use an ad in the MS Word that saves into places. This particular and in drops a second copy into a folder that automatically pushes it up to the cloud.

I have my system on a SSD drive, my user files on a 2 TB HDD drive and I have two other 2 TB HDD drives inside the case to hold the copies. (Three sets, a compressed CrashPlan, Time Machine hourly increments and an explorer style on compressed mirror of my files and folders my data.) I also have hard drives containing genuine clones of the system stacked, labelled undated. My setup is a poor man's approach is a never have enough funds for the kit that I would like :-).

I have often thought about having a raid mirror system but I am more likely to need backups for my own stupidity than for a general system crash.

I use undelete professional which allows me to keep five previous copies of deleted office documents and their new disk fragmentation system which I do not really understand but works like a breeze, it is called Velocity.

I am always interested in how people manage and keep their systems because as Chuck says there is many different ways of doing it but it certainly needs to be done.

Cheers for now

Dan



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 11/12/2015 02:48 PM
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kkkwj
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I have used Terabyte Unlimited BIBM (Boot It Bare Metal) for a decade or more. It's a low level tool (partition manager, multi-OS-boot tool, etc) because it runs first when your computer boots up. It makes a compressed image of your partition, and captures all the Windows OS settings, etc. Very reliable, ever since the old DOS days.

The problem with Windows restore points is that they don't capture _everything_ (or at least, they didn't in the old days). Sometimes I would install something bad, uninstall it, want to revert, but couldn't because of Windows settings and registry stuff. Ditto for any program that runs under Windows itself -- it can't really take a meaningful backup of the OS disk while the OS is running. So that's why I went with BIBM.

BIBM also solves an issue with new laptops (mine's a Lenovo Thinkpad) that have some sort of super low level hardware security in place. It comes with a Linux OS that I boot off a USB drive for my laptop, and then the Linux OS snaps a compressed image of the laptop boot partition. Once again, this is because a program that runs under Windows can't get at a stable disk image while the OS is running.

As for my data files, I used to do my own backups, with external RAID disks, offsite backups, and all of that. But now I just sign up with a cloud account (Dropbox, SugarSync, ICloud), and let those apps copy my world into the sky somewhere. Then it's their problem to maintain servers, backup disks, redundancy, power stability, etc.

All this has worked well for me (touch wood).

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Win10/x64, AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, 64GB RAM, Dragon 15.3, SP 6 PRO, SpeechStart, Office 365, KB 2017, Dragon Capture, Samson Meteor USB Desk Mic, Klim and JUKSTG earbuds with microphones

 09/08/2020 03:20 PM
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docinfniti
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I have a relatively new Dell box. it came with a solid-state Drive which is my boot drive and contains only programs. All data is stored on a 2nd drive, also a solid-state drive. There is 1/3 drive in the box which is a large mechanical drive. All data, ALL "SENSITIVE" material is stored in duplicate on that drive. This includes things like Dragon's user files, configuration files, I use WordPerfect - WordPerfect files that are customized with toolbars etc., and knowbrainer files. These are automatically and incrementally backed up using SYNCBAKSE FROM 2BRIGHTSPARKS LTD. The same system of multidisc backups is used on our business computer as well for billing files.

When we recently had a computer failure after a power surge, it was easy enough to pull hard drives, movement to a new box, and deploy ALL essential backups.
 09/08/2020 05:24 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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 09/15/2020 03:06 PM
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docinfniti
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Lunis, Im not sure what your comment above means. But I wonder were the user files for V15.6 reside; is it:Users\Username\Appdata\Local\Nuance\NS15\Users

 09/15/2020 08:47 PM
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Lunis Orcutt
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We just wanted you to know that you are responding to a spammer who is simply pretending to answer questions. After spammers make their 1st post, they will often come back, sometime down the road, and edit their post was hyperlinked spam. We are aware of their tricks but sometimes other end-users will respond without knowing it. We simply left you a post to explain to others why that post was removed.



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 09/16/2020 08:28 PM
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kkkwj
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For what it's worth, over the years I've moved all my data files (some of them are important, I imagine) to Dropbox and OneDrive. So I never have to worry about backing them up, and they're available on all my devices.

For my OS partition, I compress the whole partition to a separate drive (or to a DVD if I'm feeling paranoid), once a week works for me.

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Win10/x64, AMD Ryzen 7 3700X, 64GB RAM, Dragon 15.3, SP 6 PRO, SpeechStart, Office 365, KB 2017, Dragon Capture, Samson Meteor USB Desk Mic, Klim and JUKSTG earbuds with microphones

 09/22/2020 12:22 AM
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Ag
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At the moment, I do manual backups using Windows 10's system images. i.e. full disk images.

    Backup Settings > Go to Backup and Restore (Windows 7) > Create a system image.

Reasons:


Available for free on all Windows systems > 7 (although I am afraid that someday soon Microsoft will remove this "Windows 7" tool and provide only things like "File History".)


Full disk image with bitlocker encryption.



Can also be mounted so you can extract individual files if you really need to.

 

IIRC the system image format VHD can be mounted on Linux, Although IRC to it must be  un-bitlockered first.

 

Since my machine is a laptop that, at least up until COVID, would move several times a day  and was not reliably connected to external disks overnight,  manually connecting to one of the several 1-2-4TB external USB drives I have has been "good enough".   Thus, the discs are usually not connected, so less vulnerable. I keep a few off-site, encrypted

 

Moreover, most of my data lives in the cloud. Work data on work cloud,  my personal code hacking in git repos that are pushed, e.g. to my private cloud discs or to GitHub.  The stuff that lives only on my  mainly on my laptop PC that needs to  be backed up is mainly  software installations and  configurations, like Dragon and its options.ini files.  Things that are often not well  documented as individual files, So you might as well  backup the whole disk -  and figure out which files you actually need to restore posteriori, rather than  specifying a subset of the files a priori and then earning too late that you did not save something.

 

I would like to  do continuous background backups over Wi-Fi the way I used too - like Apple Time Machine, or Carbonite, or ...  But Google Backup and Sync consumes far too much CPU and network,  dragging my machine to a crawl.  I found out the hard way that Apple iCloudDrive  prevents Windows  system restore points from working. I am currently using Microsoft OneDrive,  mainly because I use OneNote,  and I push some git repos to it. But, frankly, I don't trust it. I don't know what its consistency model is.  Git  makes an effort to provide consistent atomic commits, but if the file system it is on is not atomically synchronized across the cloud, that may be  all for naught.

 

---


I used to use Carbonite cloud backups of all of my family's machines. When Carbonite decided to no longer support individuals, for a while I subscribed as a small business.   Once in a while it saved classwork for my wife and daughter,  but it was not feasible to do full disk images,  which are the form of backup  I find most convenient.

 

---

 

BTW, while we are on the topic:  Every so often I go shopping for something like Drobo or Synology. Feature wish list: Spread data reliably across multiple heterogenous discs (so I can replace the discs incrementally with whatever is the next new big size), hot plug/unplug,  dedup,  atomic snapshots, sync from my laptop across Wi-Fi incrementally, faster when plugged in to ethernet or the like,  synchronizable with disks I own at remote locations, etc.  Plus  normally keep at least one set of data off-line to reduce ransomware vulnerability,  possibly connecting  or backups on the timer (so the bad guys just have to be patient).

 

I don't expect all  can be purchased together from Drobo or Synology or ...  I would expect that to do some software configuration.   Last I checked ZFS  was close, but not  very good on heterogenous discs. AFAIK  the biggest obstacle to personal remote backups is NAT traversal and rendezvous.   are there any cloud services that provide just rendezvous and nothing else? I very much dislike opening ports through NAT,  preferring my manual backup approach to that. 

 

 

 



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DPG15.6 (also DPI 15.3) + KB, Sennheiser MB Pro 1 UC ML, BTD 800 dongle, Windows 10 Pro, MS Surface Book 3, Intel Core i7-1065G7 CPU @ 1.3/1.5GHz (4 cores, 8 logical, GPU=NVIDIA Quadro RTX 3000 with Max-Q Design.



 09/22/2020 11:45 AM
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dilligence
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Ag, 

 

In my experience the native Windows 7 disk imaging tool is not reliable. It may appear to create the image all right but is sometimes unable to restore.

 

I can recommend the free Macrium Reflect which has never let me down yet. 

I've tried virtually all Disc Imaging systems out there, Acronis, EaseUs, Clonezilla and many more. Macrium really is the most solid one.

 



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